Oblivion As An Author

Oblivion As An Author

  1. Oblivion
    Oblivion
    A place to talk about my writing style, and all of its dark, morbid deliciousness.

    (Also because I wanted some kind of discussion here, but failed to come up with any better topics.)
  2. Master Mew
    Master Mew
    I, personally, would like to know what thoughts you yourself have to share concerning your own stylistic predilections.
  3. Italy-kun
    Italy-kun
    You, my good man, are completely awesome. Time after time your characters genuinely scare me, not with the hard, fast, screaming kind of fear, but with the chilling, slowly-creeping-up-one's-back-into-one's-brain kind. Each is unique (Arceus knows I can't match that :P) and creepy in their own way.
  4. Oblivion
    Oblivion
    Quote Originally Posted by Master Mew
    I, personally, would like to know what thoughts you yourself have to share concerning your own stylistic predilections.
    Gladly.

    For as long as I can remember, I've had a fascination with villains. Maybe it's their awe-inspiring visage as figures of power. Maybe its their ability to relay countless emotions into the audience, whether they be fear, anger, respect, or even guilt and sympathy. In any case, they were almost always my favorite characters in a piece of work.

    T'was this interest in villains that began my, ahem, long and dark spiral. See, in reality, I'm actually quite a cheery person, so my writing style was not the result of some kind of pent-up rage. I started seeing that there were loads of different villains, from intellectual to chaotic to sympathetic to sadistic to human to monstrous...the list goes on. And, I wanted to know just how many there were out there, and if I could write them efficiently. So, I started writing, and up until a bit after I joined here, I was fairly, how you say, "n00b"ish. My villains were pretty sub-par, for the most part...

    Then Zaar happened. And I know just how much you all love that character.

    I base my characters around a single pivotal quirk in their personality or backstory, which drives the majority of the rest of their design. A theme, if you will. Zaar's is sadism, Dusza's is philosophy, Vlam (old character who I may or may not bring back) is arson, Ruby is heartbreak, and so on. I normally add more aspects to flesh them out further, but those motifs are up front for the majority of the time.

    One weird thing with my conceptualization is that I tend to base my characters off of songs. Honest truth.

    Vlam was based on I Am The Arsonist by Silverstein, a very, very angry song that tells the story of a man who is driven insane with rage when his wife ends up getting with one of his friends, or in Vlam's particular case, his brother. So, in a blinded frenzy, in the middle of the night, when both of them are sleeping, he bathes the house in gasoline, and lights it ablaze, killing them both.

    Ruby was based on Façade by Disturbed, which speaks of a woman who is in an abusive relationship that she can't muster up the willpower to get out of, even as she contemplates attacking her beloved. In Ruby's case, though, she does attack her love, and is inexplicably wrought with grief not soon afterwards.

    I've noticed that quite a few of my characters seem to embody different elements of insanity, or are otherwise mental disorders that could very well lead to insanity;

    Zaar - Sadism
    Wildcard - Mania
    Ruby Loria - Paranoia
    Dusza Koning - Depression
    Claus Abendroth/Marek Thorn - Dissociative identity disorder (Split personalities)
  5. Italy-kun
    Italy-kun
    Oh, and btw, do you write poetry?
  6. Master Mew
    Master Mew
    Interesting, I have also always found my central focus in any story to be the villain(s). Aside from the obvious fact that they, more often than not, drive the plot, I've always found villains to be easier to relate to than heroes - there's something more believable about someone who allows themselves to be identified by tragedy than by virtue. A good villain usually has an understandable, and believable, motivation, while a good hero seems to be identified more often than not by the lack of adequate motivation.

    Lately I've been feeling rather lazy about my tendency to focus on villains and anti-heroes, since the reality is that I've just always found crafting a credible hero to be more challenging.
  7. Oblivion
    Oblivion
    @Piximon Yes, I do write poetry. I have a few posted through my blog, written when inspiration hit me upside the head. I love writing poetry; I find it to be one of the best forms of writing when it comes to conveying emotion.
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