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Thread: "Simple" problems

  1. #16

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    Pooh, I only know it as 3.14159265358979... Perhaps I refer to my phone number as a substring of the decimal expansion of pi. Ah, yes, there it is, starting at the 14569419th digit after the decimal point. (14159... starts at the 1st digit after the decimal point.)

    Perhaps Murgatroyd's phone number is something like 314-1593 or 278-1828.

    Here's a "simple" question: is every possible string of digits equally likely to occur in the decimal expansion of pi as it would be in a randomly generated sequence of numbers?

    Another "simple" question: is it possible for pi in some exotic geometry to be less, or more than 3.14...?

    Quote Originally Posted by john1991
    Even if its the first language speakers English would win because if you put together all the English countries like UK, America, Australia, Canada- its more than the people who speaks Chinese or mandarin.
    No.

    There are some 700 - 800 million native speakers of Mandarin (depending on survey), and some 1,080 million native speakers of any sort of Chinese. There are 1.3 billion ethnic Chinese, though I will grant that a good portion, if not most of the overseas Chinese population (about 34 million) do not speak any sort of Chinese as their first language, and some of them don't even speak any sort of Chinese.

    The sum of the populations of the US, UK, Australia and Canada is only about 410 million. Other countries, which have English as one of their official languages (interestingly, USA does not), do not necessarily have English native speakers as 100% population, or even more than 50%...

  2. #17
    Java Girl Barb's Avatar Retired Staff
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    Perhaps Murgatroyd's phone number is something like 314-1593 or 278-1828.
    If Murgatroyd's phone number contained the digits '314' anywhere, I think I would fall off my chair laughing.

    Here's a "simple" question: is every possible string of digits equally likely to occur in the decimal expansion of pi as it would be in a randomly generated sequence of numbers?
    I don't know, but you might find this interesting reading. One of the funniest quotes from that article is: "If you want truly unpredictable, unrecreatable, random numbers - let my wife balance your checkbook."

    But then I came across this: "Well, there is a reason why mathematicians consider that statistics are not a branch of mathematics." It isn't?

    [EDIT: I'm sorry if I've used up my quota of dumb questions for the day, but I'm not a mathematician and I'm trying to wrap my brain around some of the posts in this thread.]

  3. #18
    Unseen Watcher Murgatroyd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barb
    If Murgatroyd's phone number contained the digits '314' anywhere, I think I would fall off my chair laughing.
    It doesn't, but for my first two years of college, my dorm room number was 314.
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  4. #19
    Java Girl Barb's Avatar Retired Staff
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    Quote Originally Posted by Murgatroyd
    It doesn't, but for my first two years of college, my dorm room number was 314.
    That is an amazingly funny coincidence.

  5. #20
    john1991
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    Heres a question?

    How can you fit 9 horses in 7 stables?

    Its a kind of a riddle!

  6. #21
    Java Girl Barb's Avatar Retired Staff
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    I've seen that riddle before.

    When does p x q not equal q x p?


  7. #22

    Default Re: "Simple" problems

    You are on a popular Kantonese (I will assume that is the correct demonym) game show. You are given a choice of 4 doors. One hides P$1,000,000; two hide MissingNo.; and one is empty. You, therefore, have 1/4 chance of picking the door with the money behind it. You select a door. The host opens one of the doors you did not select. It reveals a MissingNo. The host promises to open another door, but only if you switch. What are your odds of having selected the door with the money, and what are the new odds if you switch? (Assume all the doors look the same, and that Psychic Pokémon are barred from entering the studio.)

    The Result: (highlight to view)
    All it is is a 4-door version of the Monty Hall problem. Your odds when not switching stand at 3:1. If you switch, the odds stand at 2:1. Why? If you switch, you have 3:1 odds of switching away from a door with a MissingNo. and same chance of switching away from and empty door. Also, the host will open another door if you switch. You then have 3:2 odds of not opening the money door. If he does not open the money door, you then have 2:1 odds of having switched to the money (the other door contains a MissingNo. or is empty).

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