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  1. #46

    Default Re: Villains

    At the risk of getting a lot of guff for this; after putting some thought into the matter, I've decided to do what i wanted to do a while ago; write a profile for the villain i mentioned, his name is Orpheus C. Wraithe by the way.

    Profile - Not much is known about Wraithe's past, save only the parts that he himself has revealed. But based on the events of his life that he has mentioned, it can be assumed that he had a very rough childhood, one that left him traumatized all the way to adulthood. This caused him to become slightly unstable at some point, as he began to believe that the only way to truly get over his anger, sadness and/or depression was to make others suffer something even worse, particularly the people responsible for his pain (either by killing them or by making them wish they were dead). Wraithe spent much of his later life leaving a trail of chaos and disorder everywhere he went, but in time, it became less about him wanting to sooth his inner turmoil and more about him just enjoying the pain and suffering of others. Eventually, Wraithe decided to make it his life's goal to find new ways to spread chaos and destruction on a grand scale, just for his amusement, even if it led to the annihilation of humanity and/or the destruction of the Earth itself.

    Personality-wise, Wraithe is a very mysterious and enigmatic man; he prefers to lurk in the shadows and manipulate things and people from a distance, instead of advertising who is and what he's after. However, just because he uses Hench-people, that is not to say that he is against doing his own dirty work, in fact, he is actually very proficient in that regard, especially in combat. Wraithe is also shown to be very calculating and patient; he will plan for every scenario, he will wait for as long as it takes until his plans are ready, and even when it looks like his scheme has failed, he will always have a contingency plan waiting in the wings. Despite his sadistic and twisted nature, Wraithe is surprisingly a very calm and collected man; he always speaks with eloquence and intelligence in his voice and he is not so easily angered, this makes it quite easy for him to manipulate and play on other people's emotions. However, because he is so surprisingly calm most of the time, those around him find him to be somewhat unpredictable, as they are rarely, if ever, sure of what he's thinking or planning.

    In spite of all of his despicable qualities however, Wraithe does have some good ones as well (good being a relative term). He is always respectful towards his minions and gives them sincere praise and congratulations when proper, though, when all is said and done, he views most of them as expendable. He will also become aggressive towards them if they question his plans in a disrespectful tone and will even resort to torturing and killing them if they fail him too many times. This actually subtly prompts his minions to always be proficient at what they do and to always be respectful to their master. Wraithe is perfectly willing to give his opponents a fighting chance against him, mainly because he believes that by fighting an enemy on a fair playing field, victory will have all the more meaningful. However, if he requires his enemies to be out of the way, if only for a moment, he will resort to trickery if need be. Wraithe has a daughter that he loves dearly, mainly because he wants to prove that he can be a better father than his own, hence his reasons for trying to connect with his own child. Fortunately, his daughter, Christine, is just as sadistic as Wraithe himself, which makes it easy for the two of them to bond.

    When Wraithe encounters someone who he feels has potential or could be useful in his plans, he is quick to study them. And, if they live up to his expectations, he will insist that they be kept alive (he would not see them wasted).
    What do you think? It's still sort of a work-in-progress.

    I initially intended for the character to be one of the most evil villains of all time, but if i add things to make him sympathetic, won't that ruin that image?

    Also, in regards to the "Evil Twin" idea, like i said, i wanted a way to voice how i felt about the way the main character was treated. But if i'm basically behind the villain's perspective, how can i make the heroes the ones in the right?

  2. #47

    Default Re: Villains

    if you want to make villians set in the Pokemon World, lets take a look at the offical vilians in the Franchise.
    In the first 2 Gens, we have Team Rocket and they are clearly based on Organize Crime, in it for Money and Power. But when Gen 3 came out we have Aqua and Magma, both Villian Teams believe they have a Higher Goal and go the the Extremes to Achieve it, also would like to point out that IRL when Gen 3 came out the War on Terror is big on the News, so it's pretty cleard Aqua and Magma based on Terrorists, and that concept have been used in the Generations since. When we get to Gen 5, we have a villian team that is directly based off Real World Groups like PETA and (Surprisingly) more Extremist Groups like ALF and ARM, also would like to Point out that Team Plasma's leader Ghetsis was only using Pokemon Rights as a Front for more Darker Goals, it could be a metaphore for fears that our Own Government have ulterior motives. And now we got to Gen 6, and we have Team Flare, a group's goal is to make a more Beautiful World, and they try to achieve it by Mass Genocide, I didn't notice this until someone pointed it out but Team Flare are basically NAZIs, trying to kill everyone because they think they are only ones worthy. Also in the Anime, even tho they become more Comic Relief than Villians, Jessie and James are named after the Wild West Outlaw Jessie James.
    The Point is that the Villians in Pokemon are Based on Real World Villians, so if you need Ideas for Villians maybe read the news or study up on history.

  3. #48
    I'm just Saiyan... PiccoloX's Avatar
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    Default Re: Villains

    If the Villain knows about the "hero" and specifically prepares to stop said "hero" then the villain isn't worth noting. Such a thing only shows the villains lack of vision. The "hero" exists to stop the villain. The villain exists for their goals. Know why Superman sucks so much? I mean, other than having any corny power without having to earn it... It's because Lex Luther is a terrible villain. The Joker in DC Comics only truly shines when Batman isn't in the equation.

    Vision is what separates a villain from a hero. A hero only needs to have 1 goal, the villain should have several leading toward their ultimate goal.

    Quote Originally Posted by Srebak View Post
    When Wraithe encounters someone who he feels has potential or could be useful in his plans, he is quick to study them. And, if they live up to his expectations, he will insist that they be kept alive (he would not see them wasted).
    What do you think? It's still sort of a work-in-progress.
    Sounds like the exact same plot for The Force Unleashed. Not bashing it, but I instantly recognized it and know its a common enough story plot. It's the explanation that will set it apart, otherwise it's the same as saying your story is about "boy meets girl".

    Quote Originally Posted by Srebak View Post
    I initially intended for the character to be one of the most evil villains of all time, but if i add things to make him sympathetic, won't that ruin that image?
    Everyone knows Hitler wasn't evil to the core, but how many people say it? Don't worry about image, it writes itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Srebak View Post
    Also, in regards to the "Evil Twin" idea, like i said, i wanted a way to voice how i felt about the way the main character was treated. But if i'm basically behind the villain's perspective, how can i make the heroes the ones in the right?
    You don't. Unless your goal is to make the hero seem like the bad guy the reader will automatically assume the hero is in the right. And by "evil twin" I hope your only stating this as a reference to two characters goals or ideals and it has absolutely nothing to do with physical attributes or combat prowess. Let's leave the "identical twin with an evil mustache" thing and bizarro-opposites to cartoons and desperate comics.
    Last edited by PiccoloX; 19th March 2014 at 10:44 PM.
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  4. #49
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    Default Re: Villains

    One thing nobody mentioned here, that I think can be VERY important, is that the antagonist(s) should pose some sort of symbolic challenge, in addition to their physical challenge.
    For example, in Batman the Animated Series, the Joker threatens Batman not just through his insane plots, but through reminding him that HE MIGHT BE CRAZY AS WELL.
    Two-Face makes literal the dual nature of Batman/Bruce Wayne. The Scarecrow represents his fear, reminds him that he's not fearless, but plagued by nightmares.
    These villains challenge Batman's very identity. This, I suggest, is how you make a really good villain. Sort of. That, and what everyone's already said about making them a well-rounded character who does bad things.
    btw, recommendations of Great Villains
    Koba from Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
    Loki from Thor
    Silva from Skyfall
    Mother Gothel from Tangled
    Lady Eboshi from Princess Mononoke
    Miranda Priestley from The Devil Wears Prada

    what all of them have in common? They have clearly defined motives, and they challenge the protagonist more than just physically. In the case of Koba, Loki, and Gothel, the protagonist is even reluctant to challenge them due to their personal connection.
    Yeah, hey, personal connection is always good. Why do you think Peter Parker knows his villains before they become bad in most of the Spider-Man movies?
    Dr. Octavius is a mentor, Osborne is his friend's dad, Harry is his friend. Sandman and Venom don't really fit this, and Spider-Man 3 is not coincidentally terrible.
    The Amazing Spider-Man also has Peter befriend Dr. Connors before he becomes the Lizard. However, from what I've heard (haven't seen it) the sequel doesn't have the same level of personal connection between Peter and his villains, and is also terrible.

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