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  1. #3376
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    So what is this exactly? I dun wanna read it.

    (20:56:57) Luxis: All y'all are a bunch of Silly heads.
    RIP Giruja. Why must you have been fake?


    (17:58:01) daytwon: why am i watchin ot turtwig
    (17:58:03) ±Dratini: daytwon was muted by Heather Star for 30 minutes! [Reason: inappropriate] [Channel: Trivia]

    [15:26] Synthesis: he ain't godkilled
    [15:27] Ebail: Zam was Syn
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  2. #3377
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press


    Indeed.
    Xali and Nitro like this.

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    >7 notifications
    >6 quotes
    >all same quote

    "Hey, what's that?" Don't touch it or even fucking look
    You are Fantasia and the body bag's a fucking book

    O F \/\/ G K ┼ ∀

  4. #3379
    Made in America Captain Dude's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Guys, check out this essay that I wrote.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Dude View Post
    Guys, check out this essay that I wrote.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    It's quite swag.
    Captain Dude likes this.

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Um Victini's Special Moves, V-create, Fusion Bolt and Fusion Flare, aren't listed in the ultra dex, but I'll assume I need to go to the Daycare to get them ?

    URPG

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    "Hey, what's that?" Don't touch it or even fucking look
    You are Fantasia and the body bag's a fucking book

    O F \/\/ G K ┼ ∀
    Our dictator listens to black skateboarding satanic rappers!

    ODD FUTURE WOLF GANG KILL THEM ALL DON'T GIVE A FUCK.

    FREE EARL.

    Also, I apologize for disappearing right after I got accepted for Vermillion, I'm sure a lot of you are dying to own me but I've been busy lately and haven't been on. If you want to challenge Vermillion, VM/PM me, and whenever I log on I'll start up a forum match and then we can move it to AIM whenever I'm online.

    Didn't have backup, I could tell by the humming bike
    Reached to the glove, grabbed the mother fucking hunting knife
    Stabbed him in his neck and hip, threw him in the trunk and dipped
    Back to the fucking crib for some tea and crumpets, shit.

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Toxophilite View Post
    Um Victini's Special Moves, V-create, Fusion Bolt and Fusion Flare, aren't listed in the ultra dex, but I'll assume I need to go to the Daycare to get them ?

    Yes, because they're SM moves in the URPG, which are only achieved through the Daycare.

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Dude View Post
    Our dictator listens to black skateboarding satanic rappers!
    I thought this was common knowledge for months ?_?

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    I thought this was common knowledge for months ?_?
    You're too hipster for the likes of them, Pidge.


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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Roulette View Post
    You're too hipster for the likes of them, Pidge.


    I GOT MONEY IN MY BANK ACCOUNT, FUCK A BANK ACCOUNT - SOULJA BOY

    [18:11] [Ranger Alliance]: (webdragoon1337) nitro, you in here?
    [18:11] Nitro: hello
    [18:12] [Ranger Alliance]: (webdragoon1337) knew there was another cool guy in here

    [URPG Chat]
    3:44:43 (silverxchrome) Nitro is attractive. Source: I'm a girl.

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    golf wang

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Whatever happened to the Art Capture thingy-majiggy?
    URPG Stats


    Airik 7:42 pm
    i just hope that when puberty hits he grows out of pokemon

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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    NO U

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