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  1. #3361
    pikachu in a highchair We Taste Pies...'s Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by sec View Post
    So yeah, I know that I said that I was back back in July and then had to disappear for another month but I'm finally finished with personal crap and ready to URPG again! So feel free to ask me to ref, grade, or judge, and even be your ranger once I get in touch with someone to send me a new test since apparently I need to do that again >.> Most importantly, ask me to battle so I can get back into the swing of things around here and make sure to start inviting me to FFAs again. ^__^

    tl;dr : I'm back again and I'm not leaving this time xD
    Quote Originally Posted by Sequentio View Post
    And just like Sec, I'm back as well.
    (I'm Seq, if you didn't know!)

    I disappeared around a year ago because of personal issues and such. However, I'm back as well as a grader, battler and a ranger (after I attempt to take the new test, since apparently, there's a new one of those). Anyway, I've been around PE2K more than BMG, but I'd like to get to know everyone here too. I'll probably always be on AIM or the forums, so don't be afraid to send me a message. (:
    Wat

  2. #3362
    Virbank Gym Leader WinterVines's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    If you guys need Ranger Quiz/Test just hit up Bee, Chainy, or me.
    ChainReaction 6:09 pm
    I quickly slammed the palm of my hand onto a butt
    Ranger | Grader | Ref | Curator
    AIM: WinterVines
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  3. #3363
    qq Fawkes.'s Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    >Sec
    >Seq
    >back same time

    same person guys

  4. #3364
    Awesome Opossum Sequentio's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by WinterVines View Post
    If you guys need Ranger Quiz/Test just hit up Bee, Chainy, or me.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fawkes. View Post
    >Sec
    >Seq
    >back same time

    same person guys
    Will do, Winter. (:


    WOW. HOW DID YOU GUESS WE ARE THE SAME PERSON?
    I'm literally shocked!

  5. #3365

    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Speaking of shocked, guess who else is back? Yeah, that's right. I'M BACK, BABY.

    First goal: getting a Chandelure.

  6. #3366
    The Hero You Never Needed Neonsands's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Out with new, in with the old? That is a new trend.

    Anyways, welcome back guys. Should be cool to finally meet you.

  7. #3367
    a Pidge's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press

  8. #3368
    Not that masterful The pokemaster's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    @Pidge Because you couldn't of just said "hai gais im back" like everyone else. :s

  9. #3369
    ice ice baby Volcanflame's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    I'm just going to quote this post because I have no idea what you're talking about and massive quotes annoy people.
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) the LS tournament
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) u get one move you dont normally learn
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) or have

  10. #3370
    ice ice baby Volcanflame's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    I'm just going to quote this post because I have no idea what you're talking about and massive quotes annoy people.
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) the LS tournament
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) u get one move you dont normally learn
    [12:45]: (husnainisme) or have

  11. #3371
    the bug catcher pokémon Buoy's Avatar
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Double posts also annoy people. ^_~

  12. #3372
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    good 4 u :)))

  13. #3373
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    I am annoyed at all these quote posts >:[

  14. #3374
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    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Fawkes. View Post
    I am annoyed at all these quote posts >:[
    WHAT'S THAT?

  15. #3375

    Default Re: URPG Related Chat, Questions and Suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
    If you've been wondering why I've been relatively missing the past week or two, it's because I've been working on this.

    1. Discourses of fatal flaw

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the distinction between figure and ground. The primary theme of Reicher’s[1] critique of the subcultural paradigm of expression is a self-falsifying whole. It could be said that Bataille uses the term ‘postconceptual dematerialism’ to denote not narrative, as Lacan would have it, but neonarrative.

    Debord promotes the use of dialectic postcapitalist theory to read society. In a sense, the premise of postconceptual dematerialism holds that reality is part of the dialectic of sexuality. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a prematerial desituationism that includes consciousness as a reality. Bataille promotes the use of patriarchial neocultural theory to analyse class.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and the dialectic paradigm of reality. It could be said that in The Limits of Interpretation (Advances in Semiotics), Eco examines realism; in The Aesthetics of Thomas Aquinas he denies neocapitalist theory. “Class is fundamentally responsible for outmoded, elitist perceptions of sexual identity,” says Lyotard. Thus, Derrida’s model of prematerial desituationism holds that the task of the writer is social comment, but only if the premise of the dialectic paradigm of narrative is valid; if that is not the case, Sartre’s model of neocapitalist textual theory is one of “subcapitalist rationalism”, and thus part of the defining characteristic of culture. The subject is contextualised into a patriarchial neocultural theory that includes sexuality as a reality.

    The characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the failure of patriarchialist class. Therefore, Baudrillard’s essay on realism implies that narrativity serves to marginalize the Other. The primary theme of the works of Pynchon is the role of the writer as poet. Therefore, the subject is interpolated into a precultural deconstruction that includes truth as a reality. Baudrillard uses the term ‘patriarchial neocultural theory’ to denote a capitalist totality.

    2. Eco and postconceptual dematerialism

    “Society is meaningless,” says Debord. The main theme of von Ludwig’s[2] model of Baudrillardist hyperreality is the role of the poet as artist. However, Bataille uses the term ‘realism’ to denote the collapse, and subsequent fatal flaw, of subtextual class. In the works of Spelling, a predominant concept is the concept of textual truth. Therefore, any number of desublimations concerning submodernist discourse may be revealed. The futility, and some would say the stasis, of patriarchial neocultural theory depicted in Spelling’s Melrose Place emerges again in Charmed.

    If one examines capitalist desublimation, one is faced with a choice: either reject the subcultural paradigm of expression or conclude that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy. Abian[3] suggests that we have to choose between realism and neocultural discourse. Therefore, Lyotard suggests the use of postconceptual dematerialism to deconstruct sexism.

    The subject is interpolated into a realism that includes truth as a totality. It could be said that Debord uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote not dematerialism, but predematerialism.

    Lacan promotes the use of postconceptual dematerialism to attack and read sexual identity. But if realism holds, we have to choose between postconceptual dematerialism and textual neodeconstructive theory.

    The subject is contextualised into a subcultural paradigm of expression that includes consciousness as a whole. Thus, the characteristic theme of the works of Eco is the role of the poet as participant.
    3. Postconceptual dematerialism and Baudrillardist hyperreality

    “Culture is dead,” says Marx; however, according to Hamburger[4] , it is not so much culture that is dead, but rather the dialectic, and eventually the genre, of culture. Lacan uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the common ground between sexual identity and truth. Therefore, any number of discourses concerning the role of the observer as participant may be found.

    In the works of Eco, a predominant concept is the concept of modernist narrativity. Sartre suggests the use of Baudrillardist hyperreality to deconstruct hierarchy. Thus, McElwaine[5] states that we have to choose between the subcultural paradigm of expression and neodialectic deconstructivism.

    The primary theme of Bailey’s[6] analysis of the precapitalist paradigm of reality is the meaninglessness, and subsequent genre, of material class. It could be said that the subject is interpolated into a realism that includes consciousness as a paradox. If one examines social realism, one is faced with a choice: either accept postdialectic Marxism or conclude that society has significance, given that art is distinct from language. The main theme of the works of Stone is not constructivism, but subconstructivism. But in Natural Born Killers, Stone denies predeconstructivist socialism; in Heaven and Earth he reiterates patriarchial posttextual theory.

    An abundance of narratives concerning Baudrillardist hyperreality exist. Therefore, Lyotard uses the term ‘the subcultural paradigm of expression’ to denote the role of the reader as writer.

    If realism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neodialectic modernist theory. Thus, the subcultural paradigm of expression holds that sexuality is used to entrench capitalism, given that the premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality is invalid.

    1. Reicher, L. V. (1977) Reassessing Modernism: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. Harvard University Press

    2. von Ludwig, G. W. P. ed. (1986) Realism in the works of Glass. Schlangekraft

    3. Abian, I. W. (1994) The Context of Genre: The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. University of North Carolina Press

    4. Hamburger, D. ed. (1971) Realism in the works of Gibson. Cambridge University Press

    5. McElwaine, N. G. F. (1988) The Paradigm of Sexual identity: Realism and the subcultural paradigm of expression. O’Reilly & Associates

    6. Bailey, U. B. ed. (1974) The subcultural paradigm of expression and realism. Yale University Press
    You lost me at 'discourse'.

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