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  1. #31
    OSHAWHAT?
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    Default Re: Why is Generation II so loved by fans?

    Regarding nostalgia for Gen II...

    in general, I want to say that I don't think it should be something ignored, nor relied on too much.

    Quote Originally Posted by ZeekSlider View Post
    Two reasons. New generation of players being introduced to the franchise in one sense or another, making the DS games their first Pokemon game ever. And the second reason is because the older games are seen as graphically inferior.
    Both of which could apply to Ruby and Sapphire if you replace "DS" with "Game Boy Advance."

    The only thing is that you can still play pre-3rd gen games on a Game Boy Advance. As for pre-5th gen games on your DS... it depends on the game, and your DS...
    Seasons =/= Regions

  2. #32
    never finished Gen. 2 ZeekSlider's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why is Generation II so loved by fans?

    But the thing is, who would want to in this current generation of games? I'm doing it because it's cheaper for me at the moment and I like playing my old games. I've even decided to go through all the trouble of replacing the internal save battery on my dead Gold and Crystal games. But that's me and my current situation.

    If given the option of playing the newest, most current generation of the game or an older model for an equally older system, chances are the new one will get picked more often than not.

  3. #33
    We're very concerned. Bittersweet's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why is Generation II so loved by fans?

    Everyone keeps listing all the GREAT new features that Gen 2 introduced...
    But I don't think INTRODUCING something makes a game the best.

    Surely if Generation IV RETAINED all the features Gen 2 introduced (expanded on them in some cases) and then continued to ADD more, than Generation IV should be the best?
    I don't see how introducing something makes a game better if that same thing was in EVERY following game. By that logic, Generation I is the best since it introduced Pokemon training and battles.

    My Gold Trainer Card (Pokémon X) :)

  4. #34
    Registered User city's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why is Generation II so loved by fans?

    Pokemon crystal was, and still is my favourite Pokemon game!

  5. #35
    Time Traveler Silktree's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why is Generation II so loved by fans?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bttsstewart View Post
    Everyone keeps listing all the GREAT new features that Gen 2 introduced...
    But I don't think INTRODUCING something makes a game the best.
    A game should be judged relative to its time. Since the Pokémon series has never had to reinvent itself, features naturally get taken for granted and their initial impact wears off; new generations don't get credit for keeping old content in tact. If you want to discuss which games are the best with no regard to the time element, then Platinum and HGSS lend themselves to a far fairer comparison.

    One reason for Gold and Silver's popularity in the western community is the fact they were released only two years after Red and Blue. The short gap meant that the additions were even more impressive than they would have been had the games been released later. In Japan, the games were intiailly supposed to be released for the Game Boy in early 1998, but they were delayed so they could benefit from the Game Boy Color. This worked out for the best, but some Japanese consumers grew out of the series during the long wait; this has been the case for every country in later generations.

    I got into the Pokémon franchise in 2000, and by October I had already played Yellow and Gold. If Gold had been my first game, I wouldn't have appreciated the improvements from Generation I, seeing as the whole experience would have been new. At the same time, if I had been a player since 1996, I might have already been too familiar with the core gameplay (which is how I felt about later generations); that swift transition between generations was ideal in terms of getting me interested. Nowadays, I don't get excited when new Pokémon are revealed, even if there are some interesting concepts still left. I remember being very curious about evolution in Generation I when it seemed like an a somewhat unpredictable phenomenon, but then I realized that the mechanics were simple. Fortunately, breeding came very shortly afterwards, and some research was required to work out all the details regarding inheritance; breeding must have been very interesting even to the casual players.

    By the end of 2000, I already had another game to look forward to - Crystal. The Japanese players had a unique advantage by way of Crystal having online communication (via the Mobile Adapter); even though the system was not perfect due to the service's limitations, the idea was highly innovative for its time. I didn't know that the Mobile Adapter would be removed from the English version, and I was eager to learn everything about it. That might have led to disappointment, but it's part of what made Generation II exciting to me. I suspect that the lack of such communication in Generation III was almost as disappointing to Japanese players as the absence of old Pokémon from Ruby and Sapphire. The difference is that the old Pokémon came back in FRLG, whereas we had to wait until late 2006 (six years after Crystal) for the return of online play. I, for one, wasn't impressed by the Wi-Fi features in Generation IV because no innovative progress had been made from Crystal; the Global Link and random battles should have been introduced then, but they were kept under wraps for another four years. You could say that Crystal spoiled the advent of Wi-Fi for me.

    Junichi Masuda has cited the inclusion of Kanto as a reason for Generation II's popularity. If to put a finer point on it, I think that the positive effect was created by the surprise that the story didn't end after the Elite Four and that some deviation was being taken from a pre-existing formula. Granted, a return to Kanto wasn't the best way to do something new, but few fans would have liked a different experience at the time. When Crystal was released, though, I personally came to the conclusion that the Suicune and Ruins of Alph sidequests were far more interesting than another badge quest. To this day I feel that the series should be more mythology-driven, and that even though later generations had a more engaging plot, the legends were either lacking or not original enough compared to Johto's. The only time I've ever thought of Pokémon as more than creatures who live to battle was when I played the Johto games.
    Last edited by Silktree; 18th March 2011 at 05:40 AM.
    Blue1225 likes this.

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