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A Wizard is Never Late.

If you think about it...

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If you think about it, flying pokemons should really be immune to electric attacks because birds land on power lines all the time.

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  1. Bill Cipher's Avatar
    Power lines have a rubber coating BTW.
  2. TheMissingno.'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by MidnightSunset
    Power lines have a rubber coating BTW.
    Cool, then you should go outside and touch one with a metal pole and see how that goes for you.

    *DISCLAIMER: I was being sarcastic, don't actually do that.
  3. kronos's Avatar
    if memory serves me right birds can only stand on powerlines because they only land on one powerline at a time because When the bird stands on the charged wire, her its body gains the same charge as that one wire. therefore no shock. it dosn't conduct as well as the wire. Also the eletric flow goes from high to low But if a bird were to touch any grounding point at all the circuit will be completed basicaly fried birdy. Most things can be the grounding point.
  4. Karamazov's Avatar
    But there are electric stoves and ovens, right?
  5. TheMissingno.'s Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Karamazov
    But there are electric stoves and ovens, right?
    Yeah, so?
  6. Mijzelffan's Avatar
    But when a bird sits on a power line it's roosting, and when a flying pokémon uses roost it temporarily loses its flying typing.
  7. Jabberwocky's Avatar
    They're fine as long as they're only on one line. Touching another would mean they'd get roasted.
  8. Crystal Onix's Avatar
    I watched a thing about people who work on power lines from helicopters. Apparently, they need to get the whole worker/helicopter system adjusted to the line's electrical field before touching it or both will get fried mostly by getting completely into the line's surrounding field. If it works like that for a person on a helicopter, I'd assume it works the same for birds. Also, airplanes occasionally get struck by lightning, but the plane's structure causes the electricity to flow across the skin. Because of that, I'd think birds sometimes get struck by lightning too, and that it'd work on them much the same way as the electric chair on humans.

    Don't quote me on that, though, it's a hypothesis at best.

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